That is the question. 

And really. A phrase once written by William Shakespeare (should I join the trending mainstream of a modern day and question the actual existence of this English writer? Well, I would rather prefer to leave this question to experienced historians and literature specialists...) as a part of Hamlet's monologue within eponymous play (back in like 17th century?) remains highly relevant even today. And the question is relevant primarily due to over-contradictions. Contradictions regarding religion and nationality, culture and background, education and intelligence, habitual and new world order, social and personal kind of things and much-much more. Seriously, if you happen, at least once in a lifetime, to look outside own box (put it brain pan if you want) you will notice the world full of these, so-called, double standards.


Now why I actually decided to finally bring this point around, the double standards and so (still not in its full depth though), is due to the infamous article published on Vogue.com in late September. The article-kind-of-discussion between 4 Vogue digital-editors that was supposed to cover Milan Fashion Week but turned into 'bullying bloggers' session. You can read the article HERE. And the issue is... there are people (girls and boys, influencers, bloggers, you name it) who are either paid or borrow designer clothes in order to wear it throughout fashion weeks. And the issue is... Vogue.com editors sound to be insulted by it all - otherwise why would call on bloggers to get a normal job? (How do you identify one?) Now let me say that I happen to find myself within both of these directions - bloggers (so far so good, 5 years with PQAP) and fashion writers/journalists (that's where my fashion intellectual finds her way out). And when it comes to me, I don't see it as a problem when bloggers pull this or that clothing piece or designer as long as it fits their personality and image. And what's so wrong with bloggers getting paid for such piece of work? (especially if it helps a company to generate sales?) See, it's the 21st century and we have so many ways to play around this game of entrepreneurship. 


Bloggers don't steal these clothes or kill others for it, so what's the issue? Okay, the issue might be if a person is doing it for the sake of self-promotion rather than to show off own style and/or send an important visual message. Maybe it's excessive self-promotion that drives those 4 Vogue (musketeers) editors mad? I personally so don't feel like capturing street style photographer's attention on purpose. I would rather spend time putting down own thoughts for a new article and so. But, huh, we all are different. And digital world allows to express own-self by means of all these different ways. But going back to Vogue's article, it's quite strange to me read phrases like 'get a normal job' and blah blah blah. I mean we all know of Vogue's partner-friend-ship with Kardashians-Jenners clan. Since when reality shows became a sort of a normal job? Or publishing a book filled with selfies became a sort of a new author's way of self-expression? See, here we go with double standards in fashion environment. And, yes, Alessandra Codinha, there are more serious things happening in the world. So why don't we discuss 9 year old girls being forced to marry an adult man? Or why don't we discuss females being sold and turned into slaves even in the 21st century? Or under aged kids so far working at this or that factory? Isn't it about uniting forces and making this planet a better place for all of us? At the end of the day, we all are one human race and actually happen to like each other regardless our jobs, religious and political views, food preferences and so on. Face it, diversity on all levels is cool.


Okay, now that is one big story. I think it's been quite some time since I last published something like this. And you know, this is so cool. I really felt like sharing it all. These thoughts have been bombarding my mind ever since the article happened to spread across many and many sources. The bloggers thing within fashion is a pretty interesting topic and I guess it's not the very last time I'm speaking about it. As there is so much more I feel like saying. Thank you Vogue.com for pleasing my fashion intellectual. A good portion of food for thought. But, well, enough for today. Speaking of this outfit, I love the laid-back effect it brings around. Even though we see quite a formal blazer and classy heels playing a pretty important part out here. Surely it's all due to track pants in crushed velvet, the ones that keep coming to my fashion rescue over and over again for the past 2 years. The same scenario goes to beloved DKNY blazer. So fashion is all about 'saving is caring'. And when it comes to refreshment you can simply bring a new top and hat around. Yes, it's all in the hat...


Look of the Day:
DKNY blazer
H&M pants
Aldo heels


Photo: T. Egorova


That is the question. 

And really. A phrase once written by William Shakespeare (should I join the trending mainstream of a modern day and question the actual existence of this English writer? Well, I would rather prefer to leave this question to experienced historians and literature specialists...) as a part of Hamlet's monologue within eponymous play (back in like 17th century?) remains highly relevant even today. And the question is relevant primarily due to over-contradictions. Contradictions regarding religion and nationality, culture and background, education and intelligence, habitual and new world order, social and personal kind of things and much-much more. Seriously, if you happen, at least once in a lifetime, to look outside own box (put it brain pan if you want) you will notice the world full of these, so-called, double standards.


Now why I actually decided to finally bring this point around, the double standards and so (still not in its full depth though), is due to the infamous article published on Vogue.com in late September. The article-kind-of-discussion between 4 Vogue digital-editors that was supposed to cover Milan Fashion Week but turned into 'bullying bloggers' session. You can read the article HERE. And the issue is... there are people (girls and boys, influencers, bloggers, you name it) who are either paid or borrow designer clothes in order to wear it throughout fashion weeks. And the issue is... Vogue.com editors sound to be insulted by it all - otherwise why would call on bloggers to get a normal job? (How do you identify one?) Now let me say that I happen to find myself within both of these directions - bloggers (so far so good, 5 years with PQAP) and fashion writers/journalists (that's where my fashion intellectual finds her way out). And when it comes to me, I don't see it as a problem when bloggers pull this or that clothing piece or designer as long as it fits their personality and image. And what's so wrong with bloggers getting paid for such piece of work? (especially if it helps a company to generate sales?) See, it's the 21st century and we have so many ways to play around this game of entrepreneurship. 


Bloggers don't steal these clothes or kill others for it, so what's the issue? Okay, the issue might be if a person is doing it for the sake of self-promotion rather than to show off own style and/or send an important visual message. Maybe it's excessive self-promotion that drives those 4 Vogue (musketeers) editors mad? I personally so don't feel like capturing street style photographer's attention on purpose. I would rather spend time putting down own thoughts for a new article and so. But, huh, we all are different. And digital world allows to express own-self by means of all these different ways. But going back to Vogue's article, it's quite strange to me read phrases like 'get a normal job' and blah blah blah. I mean we all know of Vogue's partner-friend-ship with Kardashians-Jenners clan. Since when reality shows became a sort of a normal job? Or publishing a book filled with selfies became a sort of a new author's way of self-expression? See, here we go with double standards in fashion environment. And, yes, Alessandra Codinha, there are more serious things happening in the world. So why don't we discuss 9 year old girls being forced to marry an adult man? Or why don't we discuss females being sold and turned into slaves even in the 21st century? Or under aged kids so far working at this or that factory? Isn't it about uniting forces and making this planet a better place for all of us? At the end of the day, we all are one human race and actually happen to like each other regardless our jobs, religious and political views, food preferences and so on. Face it, diversity on all levels is cool.


Okay, now that is one big story. I think it's been quite some time since I last published something like this. And you know, this is so cool. I really felt like sharing it all. These thoughts have been bombarding my mind ever since the article happened to spread across many and many sources. The bloggers thing within fashion is a pretty interesting topic and I guess it's not the very last time I'm speaking about it. As there is so much more I feel like saying. Thank you Vogue.com for pleasing my fashion intellectual. A good portion of food for thought. But, well, enough for today. Speaking of this outfit, I love the laid-back effect it brings around. Even though we see quite a formal blazer and classy heels playing a pretty important part out here. Surely it's all due to track pants in crushed velvet, the ones that keep coming to my fashion rescue over and over again for the past 2 years. The same scenario goes to beloved DKNY blazer. So fashion is all about 'saving is caring'. And when it comes to refreshment you can simply bring a new top and hat around. Yes, it's all in the hat...


Look of the Day:
DKNY blazer
H&M pants
Aldo heels


Photo: T. Egorova

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